A Gardener’s Delightful Season

A Gardener’s Delightful Season

Tuqa Asedi, M2, Class of 2025

I started gardening a couple years ago after I decided to finally pursue my dream of having a rose garden. The rose garden is still in progress, but I have had so much fun along the way. This year, I started taking photos of the flowers that I grew. It was a productive year; I had so many beautiful Zéphirine Drouhin rose blooms that I made delicious rose jam for my family! My Stargazer Lilies made a stunning and fragrant centerpiece on the coffee table. Some of my Zinnia seedlings died from the heat wave, some were eaten by bunnies, but the ones that survived had bright, vibrant colors. I bought a new bare-root climbing rose in the spring, and I was pleasantly surprised to see it bloom this year, its first year, which can be uncommon. I also saw a hummingbird drink out of my Petunia basket on multiple occasions. I have never seen one in real life and I could not contain my excitement! Other beautiful creatures that I got to see were different types of birds, a hummingbird hawk moth, and a neon-green praying mantis that lived on my Perfume Delight rose. Overall, it was a joyful experience and I am super excited for the next season. But for now, I am busy collecting the fallen autumn leaves to make food for next year’s flowers.

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Picnic Under the Weeping Willow

Picnic Under the Weeping Willow

Sricharan Yadali, M2, Class of 2025

Taken at Loose Park, Kansas City. To me, this photograph represents a scene of pure serenity. I am particularly drawn to capturing scenes that place people in harmony and at ease with their surroundings, whether that be in nature or in the urban core of the city. I very much enjoy using film to instill an almost meditative, intentional focus to my photography. I use it to achieve a dream-like quality, like that of recalling a fond memory. I made this photograph using Fuji Superia 400 film, metered at 200 ISO, though my trusty Konica Hexar AF with 35 mm f/2 lens.

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Hibernal Reflection

Hibernal Reflection

Trenton Edwards, M2, Class of 2025

Soon, our northern hemisphere will enter into Winter. The sun sets earlier and its warmth fades, sending trees, bears, and countless others into hibernation. In doing so, these creatures can recover from a year’s worth of wear and tear and rest in anticipation of Spring’s growth. As we too retreat indoors, we are also given a chance to look inward; an opportunity to reevaluate our relationship with others, with nature, and with ourself. Winter provides space to think about what has been left behind and what lays ahead. It gives us a chance to be more intentional about those we spend time with, and to witness those who choose to spend their time with us. Though this season may evoke feelings of loss and isolation, it is time spent alone which allows for reflection and growth. As we approach our annual chrysalis, may we put in the work necessary to emerge reborn.

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Quilling

Quilling

Edith Sigler, M1, Class of 2025

Quilling is a form of paper art that traditionally uses only paper strips and glue.  I learned about it when I was very young at a festival in Ohio, but I never thought of it as something I could do.  Several years ago, I was given a quilling kit for Christmas.  It wasn’t until a very long Christmas break due to the pandemic last year that I started to learn how to do quilling.  I loved it, and after learning some basic designs from a book, I started to try to make 3D objects based on pictures or real objects.  The first thing I made without a pattern was a miniature mountain dulcimer for my grandma’s birthday.  As a musician, I was careful to try to get the correct relative spacing of the frets.  Now I love to make various quilling projects when I have time and give them to friends and family, especially those who I didn’t see much in the last year.  

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Good Morning Mom

Good Morning Mom

Tiffany Killblane, M3, Class of 2023

Lokus Corgus Maximus (that was his full AKC name) or Loki for short was my first dog that I got as an adult–I literally picked his floofy corgi butt up on my way from graduating with my bachelors degree and leaving Colorado to start my masters degree in Kansas. He was 7 weeks old when we headed to Wichita together. He was my best friend and rock through my twenties: bad decisions and bad relationships, moving into apartments with nothing but a bedroom set, me learning how to become a college instructor, him learning how to become a service dog and even fathering a few sets of puppies (which terrified him in much the same way having human babies for the first time terrify human adults).

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Plaza Art Fair at Sunset

Plaza Art Fair at Sunset

Sricharan Yadali, M1, Class of 2025

Last year I unearthed my parents’ old Pentax point-and-shoot that they purchased in the mid 1990s. Upon asking them about the camera, my parents told me about fond memories that they had using it to capture their first few years in a new and foreign land. To all of our surprises, it still worked! I quickly purchased some film and took the camera with me on family trips. When I got scans of my pictures back, I was astounded. 

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Windows

Windows

Trent Edwards, M1, Class of 2025

You’ve heard it said that no man is an island, but during COVID’s prolonged quarantine, it was difficult not to identify with that floating, isolated unit of life. As minutes turned into weeks, I found myself starving for the very sense of connection which Maslow postulated was a human need. When quarantine ended, I stumbled out into the world with a cautious desperation to rekindle relationships. I participated in conversations with vigor and listened intently. Yet, despite my enthusiasm, I still felt… distant. Sure, there was physically 6 feet of distance, but I found myself confronting another barrier. How could I connect with someone while half their face was covered? 

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Himalayan Adventure

Himalayan Adventure

Katelyn Schumacher, M4, Class of 2022

I had the amazing opportunity to travel to Nepal in 2019 to take on the Everest Base Camp Trek. This entailed about a week of trekking and staying at teahouses along the way. The first photo was taken about halfway through the trek near Thukla Pass, which is where all memorials for those who lost their lives attempting the famous summit were located. Each one was made of stone and typically decorated with prayer flags. The second photo was taken of Mt. Everest. Seeing the mountain felt surreal and made the thin air worth it. At 5,364 meters elevation, the air was thin and landscape completely covered in snow and ice. Glacier water ran next to the base through the crevasses. The moment we made it gave me a sense of accomplishment, humility, and clarity. 

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